A Filmmaker In Our Midst

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We at urbaneer are a talented eclectic bunch, which teamed up based on our love of Toronto real estate and our indelible insouciant charm. But did you know we come from dramatically different backgrounds? This allows each of us to add our dynamic points of view, making us collectively stronger and better suited to serve the needs of our equally diverse clientele. 

You may have heard the urbaneer team proudly includes an acclaimed professional musician, the owner of hip Cabbagetown design hub Spruce, and even a recently betrothed newlywed. But did you also know the team includes a film director?

Yes, Carl Laudan is a bona fide feature film director and a director member of the Director’s Guild of Canada in addition to his real estate career. He doesn’t generally put it in his bio, because like various professional real estate designations he likes to keep his talents out of view of the competition.

As Carl says: “There’s virtually no skill that we use in film direction that isn’t excellent to use in real estate negotiations.”

When he’s making a film like his last feature drama Sheltered Life, one of the most important jobs he has is to make sure the emotions, expressions, movement and body language his stars use are communicating the intention of the dialogue from the screenplay. If it’s not, there’s a problem. It might be something the actor’s confused about regarding the motivation of the character. Now imagine you’re Carl during the negotiation of a home purchase and you’re watching the faces and body language of the sellers and their representatives compared with what words are being said—and you can see the advantage.

In fact, what drew Carl from just owning his own home to wanting to find, negotiate, and sell other people’s homes and businesses comes from an actual experience securing a location for a movie:

“We had an entire section of a film we needed to shoot in a field. The only fields in the municipality we were in were city parks, the land underneath bridges and a single 14 acre lot privately owned that was still pre-construction. The city went on strike the week before we went to camera, so parks were out. The lands underneath the bridges were already booked by other activities even though we had permits to shoot there. We couldn’t come to an arrangement.  So we were left with the private development land with no other options. 

They wanted $10,000 per day with a minimum engagement of 21 days. Our budget allowed $300 per day for four days. So after more than 40 calls, more than ten solid “no’s”, my last call was to the senior VP in charge of the development on the private land. She was busy playing golf, and came down with a super-final “no”. As soon as I got off the phone with them I called their work voice mail and left this true message: “On average, somewhere between the 9th and the 18th hole a woman in Canada was

 murdered by her spouse, our film is about that woman. So please…don’t stand in our way.” On the Monday we were informed we had the field for four days at $300 per day. In that moment I realized I should be in real estate.” -Carl.

Carl is bringing his filmmaking skills into the Urbaneer fold and will be making fabulous listing videos for select Urbaneer properties in addition to all of the promotion we normally do. He is currently gearing up to make a feature comedy The Death (and Life) of Carl Naardlinger starring Matt Baram (Seed), Grace Lynn Kung (Insecurity) and Mark Forward (Jon Dore Television Show).

The magic of the Urbaneer team lies both in our understanding of real estate, and how our different backgrounds collectively elevate the experience of buying and selling. Whether you engage one of us, or more, we are consistently supporting each other by engaging our different points of view and varied experiences. How many other teams can claim that?

~ the urbaneer team

earn your trust, then your business

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